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growing concern about the bombing of rebel-held areas by gaddafi's forces, there are voices in the u.s. and europe calling for the rebels to be armed to directly. it sounds simple, but history offers plenty of cautionary tales. in a moment, we will hear whether senator john mccain thinks it is a good idea. >> what i am calling for is a greater access for the libyan opposition forces for weaponry. >> there is no guarantee that by helping these people, you necessarily bring about a more democratic outcome or more desirable outcome. >> the question is, what kind of arms with a supply? whom would supply them? britain session -- britain's special forces may have suffered a setback last week in libya. but the momentum is still building in the west for military intervention of some kind, including perhaps arm the rebels. in libya, repeated bombing by government warplanes around the rebel-held oil town of ras lanuf marks colonel gaddafi's drive in his country. opposition forces are determined, but still lack a clear organization or command structure. the worst violence was reported near tripol
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
to be the targets here, but that there are ground force near the sites where the u.s. is targeting, that they could become casualties at this point. do you think, given what we do know about libya, this would be enough to motivate people to switch sides, to back off, to rethink their support of libya's strongman? >> as i said, it's really about momentum right now. if there's any sense the momentum is shifting against the gadhafi regime, we're likely to see additional defections. the only thing that reverses it is that gadhafi was still strong and he had a lot of tools as his disposal. it could happen. when you look at the u.n. resolution, everybody's been saying it's about civilians. but if you look at the text, it gives the international community and those carrying out the commission is it gives them tools. every target in libya is a legitimate target if it's tied to civilians. the mission is about defending civilians. you've already stated the u.s., the europeans, most of those who are part of the coalition really don't think they can live with gadhafi as president of libya. they see him has hav
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
-country, 5-day tour, meant to establish u.s. ties and to reconfirm and build some of those ties, so he takes a lot of criticism for this trip as you well know having watched the coverage over the last several days as the attack on libya was ramping up. bill: in the meantime president obama suggesting libyan people are ready to move on without qaddafi from an interview late last night. >> we believe it's not a matter of military might, but instead an idea that comes to the libyan people that it's time for a change that ends up ultimately sweeping qaddafi out of power. bill: that may be the case in the end. so far though that's not happened. new videotape you can watch from tripoli, the libyan capitol, this as car daie appearing -- this is qaddafi appearing last night in front of a crowd, it looks like several thousand people in a field, at the same palace that was bombed two days ago by these tomahawk cruise missiles launched by the british into that palace. want to bring in this map now and show you the theater of operations throughout the entire mediterranean and europe. there are so
nuke chenuclear plantse availablize ie izstabilizing. >>> we begin in libya. u.s. says coalition air strikes have established a no fly zone in the east soon to be extendeded to tripoli. richard engel, they say the operation went as well as could be expected. but there are a lot of questions remaining about whether we'll be able to turn this command over to whom and the opposition. how much do we though about the opposition in wlib qua and how do you distinguish between rebel forces and civilians? >> reporter: it's difficult to distinguish from rebel forces and civilians because the rebels until a few days ago or a few weeks ago were mostly civilians and they don't have a cheer leadership, they don't have uniforms. they don't have marked vehicles. and a lot of them are very undisciplined and up frofrnfo l unprofessional. they were trying to see how extensive the air and missile strikes were yesterday. today we were just out with rebel, watching them get into pickup trucks and head toward the front lines. we were watching rebels head to an area where they believe they have liberated m
about this? "jihadis that fought us the u.s. in iraq and afghanistan now enjoy american support in libya." excuse me? that means the people who we were actually shooting at on the battlefield, we now giving arms to in libya. this libya rebel commander says his fighters have al-qaeda links. we'll have more on the story at the bottom of the hour. let's see if we have this right. we have a nobel peace prize winning president, encouraging unrest in the mast. saying rise up, isn't this great? look, now people are rising up. people are getting killed everywhere. then he gave the commander to launch america's third military conflict with a muslim nation that poses no immediate threat. never made the case to the american people. and no exit strategy. no one is even asking or answering the question what does victory look like? chaos. the "new york times" is reporting now that the muslim brotherhood has now formed a tactic partnership with the egyptian military. oh, that seems great. and they're poised to grab control. what do you say? shirria law? no -- shiria law? no. in libya, guess who is lini
general wesley clark. after that i discussion on the state of u.s. public education. >> i am a numbers guy. >> as a visual op-ed columnist for "in york times," charlie blow uses trawls and brett -- charts and graphs i do not decide that will talk about a subject and look for the data. i search for that that person see if there is something interesting and that agrees with an opinion that i have or sometimes what surprises me and what surprised by readers. >> sunday night it 8:00 on c- span. >> no reporter's roundtable on the role of nato in libya. from "washington journal," this is 55 minutes. scully is with "national journal" and we have missy ryan -- pentagon reporter. how significant is it that nato will step up and take the lead? guest: it is an important step but not everything the obama administration wanted. what they have done it is often rise nato countries to enforce the no-fly zone but that is only the first part of the u.n. security council resolution. what the nato countries did not do is authorize the full mandate, which is all necessary means required to protect civilians.
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
. these were the scenes last night. antiaircraft fire was heard in the skies over the capital. the head of u.s. forces in the region says, progress so far has been, quote, very effective. no libyan aircraft have been seen since allied operations began at the weekend. on the ground, government forces are gradually being pushed back from rebel-held benghazi. >> the coalition extended no-fly zone across other parts of libya. allied planes flew enforcement missions over tripoli and misrata since start. coalition forces have fired 159 tomahawk cruise missiles on libya. a military spokesman says after the initial strikes american forces were moving into what he called a patrolling phase. cnn's nic robertson is in tripoli where colonel gadhafi's forces are been trying to defend the capital. he watched the anti-aircraft fire sweep the sky and explained how libyan gunners are trying to deflect those incoming attacks. >> reporter: military people know more about military things tell me they're trying to create an arc of fire through the sky. that's where they we have the weapon and you see the tracers m
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victo, denouncinghat he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for control in eastern libya, where thehave been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention w
. the u.s. is making it increasingly clear that having been in the lead of the libyan mission, it wants to step back now. the latest reports from the rebel-held town talk of pro gaddafi snipers filing at the hospital. -- firing at the hospital. >> please, please bomb his forces until they stop. i have to be impartial because i am a medical person, but five, six consecutive days that have been killing with tanks and artillery, bombing us. please stop him. >> other residents say they have attacked their base. the rebels remain for now force of on certain potential, but it is clear the situation is increasingly turning into a test of the coalition possibility to influence events on the ground. -- the coalition's ability to influence events on the ground. >> with me now it is ben brown. there has been much activity around you today? >> the rebels are still trying to push west, about an hour-and- a-half from here, trying to take advantage of the coalition air strikes and military action which they are seeing day after day, night after night. the rebels are making heavy delegate of getting an
an international coalition as it takes all necessary measures. >> with u.s. allies taking the lead president obama is being briefed on developments while he is in brazil. >> our consensus was strong and resolve clear. the people of libya must be protected and in the absence of an immediate end to the violence against civilians, our coalition is prepared to act and act with urgency. >> the latest from benghazi shows tanks approaching the city have stopped as thick, black smoke rises from the rebel stronghold. with me right now from cairo, egypt is nbc's richard engel. richard, from your perspective, from your vantage point, how optimistic is the arab world that they can stop the violence toward civilians in libya? >> this is a, you have to understand what's going on in libya in the context of the wider middle east. the middle east is going through an incredible period of flux with revolts and uprisings and revolutions from north africa stretching all the way to the arabian peninsula. all arab governments are in the cross hairs right now, very unpopular with their people. there have been successful
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. >> thank you. britain says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victory, denouncing what he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for controleastee been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention would not
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
and there are clear signs of headway on two fronts. no more need for cruise missiles since in the words of one u.s. official we now have air dominance. coalition forces can fly to their targets in jets having little to fear from the bombed out defenses of the regime. if you're counting, the allies fired 162 tomahawk missiles since saturday. the vast majority american. if carried out 175 sorties since yesterday. behind the scenes we may be nearing a breakthrough in the back and forth over command and control. the u.s. and britain won a leading role for nato. france and arab nations don't. now it seems nato will coordinate the troops and hardware while political leaders call the shots. they're due to meet tuesday in london. >>> moammar gadhafi is vaui is o fight on. i want to bring in cnn national security analyst peter bergen to talk about this. good to have you with us. let's start by talking about the opposition. we heard so much about the rebels on the ground in libya. what do you know about them and do you know if they can be trusted? >> well, let's start with the fact that the u.s. government
to be qaddafi's presidential compound. still, both the brits and the u.s. military leaders say qaddafi is not the target of this mission. >> this is not about going -- going after qaddafi himself or attacking him at this particular point in time. it's about achieving these narrow and relatively limited objectives so that he stops killing his people and so humanitarian support can be provided. >> still, certainly it is sys m symbolic to the libyan leader can hit his home. our defense secretary says the u.s. role in this effort should begin to diminish. >> we expect that in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition. we will have a military role in the coalition. but we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> admiral mullin says that support role will include intelligence support, jamming capabilities and assistance with the overall mission and the no-fly zone. back to you guys in new york. >> thanks for setting the table. john kerry, seniator sessions, admiral mullin, e
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
. we are ok. no problem. >> in the east, the air campaign had its first loss, a u.s. air force eagle jetfighter crashed in rebel territory. the alliance says it wasn't shot down but suffered mechanical failure. its two crewmen have been rescued. east of tripoli, the fight for control of the city goes on. rebel forces were enjoying a moment of celebration. then this. how quickly the moment turned to panic and retreat. >> the condition is so serious. since last night, they have no lights, electricity in the hospital. they're working with generators. yesterday it was disaster because more than 22 missiles. >> 1973 pact, no one to die. >> no one died last night. the libyan government insists they will swear many civilians have been killed and wounded by allied strikes t might well be true. we have asked them for evidence. so far, they have not provided it. bbc news, tripoli. >> the american admiral leading the international operation to enforce the no-fly zone has said gaddafi loyalists are still attacking civilians and coalitions are considering options to stop that. on a diplomatic lev
is preparing to take over the military campaign against mullah omar el gadhafi. how big a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge and with war fatigue setting in and criticism coming from both sides of the aisle, president obama will explain what's at stake in libya in an address to the nation on monday evening. plus, fear of spreading terrorism there where anti-government demonstrations and in some cases violence in many arab countries today. in yemen, thousands turned out calling for the ouster of the u.s.-backed president there. if that president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? plus, with hispanics making up one out of every six americans and one out of every four children, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. >>> finally,
is preparing to take over the military campaign against moammar gadhafi. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's at stake in libya for the united states? the white house will address is monday evening. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of the u.s.-backed president there. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the
. the u.s. stepped up their military campaign overnight firing more than 20 tomahawk cruise missiles at a weapons site at a storage facility in tripoli. >> for two days they've race -- they've raced back and forth. organized and supplies, their gains have proved agile while air strikes gave them confidence. their poeten as i is there even though they have lack of weapons. >> it's fair to say if we wanted to get weapons in libya, we probably could. we are looking at all our options at this point. >> in london a cavel kade of more than 40 countries met and planned what a post gaddafi libya might look like. some wondered if gaddafi could be persuaded into exile. but they are looking at upholding the resolution. >> the arms embargo applies to the whole of libya, though they might allow equipment to be given to people purely to defend themselves in a limited way. but we have not taken decision to do that. >> as gaddafi supporters celebrated yesterday's advances, this conflict is looking more finely balanced. anti-aircraft like these may dominate libyan skies but so far their mission has b
the libyan air force and no longer exists as a fighting force. the senior u.s. commander says that troops loyal to gaddafi are still violating a u.n. resolution 1973. misrata is besieged by government tanks and artillery. mike will reject reports. >> characteristically the finance -- define it, colonel gaddafi on the first night of bombing. he said that those attacking libya would end up in the dustbin of history. colonel gaddafi has pledged there would be no surrender, and this on another night with a burst of anti-aircraft fire. from the american secretary of state hillary clinton, a suggestion that efforts might be under way to look for an exit strategy. >> i am not aware that he personally has reached out, but i know people allegedly on his behalf up and reaching out. that is why i say this is a very dynamic situation. >> be diplomatic strategy has been to convince the libyan leader to take another course. these pictures provide more insight into the military reality confronting him and his forces. it shows as helicopters taking off for an operation at night with american ships involv
here? >> we are feeling normal, ok. no problem. >> and in the east, the first loss -- a u.s. f-15e eagle jet fighter. the airline said it was not shut down, but suffered mechanical failure. and the fight for control of misrata goes on. rebel forces were enjoying a moment of celebration. then this. how quickly the moment turned to panic. >> i have no light, electricity in the hospital. i am working with a generator. 1973 -- i have civilians dying every day to day. >> know when dying in this bombing last night. the libyan government insists that many civilians have been killed and wounded by allied strikes. it might well be true. we have asked for evidence. so far, they have not provided. bbc news, tripoli. plexus the united states is -- >> the united states is keen to relinquish its leadership role in the military campaign. president obama and prime minister cameron and presidents are cozy agreed that nato's -- president sarkozy agreed that nato felt military structures should take the leading role. president obama has been on the phone to paris and london. >> yes, if he is doing a
>> today on "christian world news" war over libya. once again the u.s. takes military action in a muslim nation. what does it mean for the church in the middle east? >> plus -->> we got everything we need. we are so fortunate. what can we do to help? >> truckload of compassion, a ministry distributing to japan. >> from the uk, the christian counselor that could lose his job for telling a gay man homosexuals can change. >> revolutions and military strikes in the middle east raise concerns for the region's christian. hello everyone i am wendy griffith. >> and i am george clooney. george thomas. the united states put together the coalition enforcing a no-fly zone over the nation of libya. state goal, to protect libyan citizens by a massacre by moammar gadhafi's forces. the conflict is raising forces about western interventions in muslim nations. specifically, charges of a christian crusade against the islamic face. cliffton clark is an associate professor of global missions at regent university. recently i spoke with him about this very issue. >> do muslim nations see the u.s. t
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
be a solution, a fair solution on the palestinian issue. i think... with the u.s. saying whether it was going to have this hijacked or not, whether it's hijacked or not, one thing that is, i think, irreversible is that there is going to be a free press in all these countries. that is irreversible. and that... whatever the government says, that free press is going to demand a better implementation of agreement between israel and the arab countries. i understand that israel is buying egyptian guards cheaper than the egyptian consumer and 40% cheaper than the jordanians. i don't think the egyptians would like to... >> rose: well, there have also been stories that people in gaza were paying a lot more for things that came from israel than the people of israel were paying for them. >> well, that's inside israel, inside the occupation. but the egyptians are going to say how come we sell our goods to a neighbor-- no matter how friendly they are-- than to another neighbor, jordan, or to ourselves. that's very difficult to justify. >> would you speculate that it's more likely that freely-elected leade
which recognized the independence of u.s.a. and also in morocco you signed, america, the first treaty, trade, and also protection against piracy. and we've done a good job since the beginning. but now i think that u.s.a. tried to encourage the best evolution possible in the arab world because the arab world is not monolithic in terms of political regimes. and the monarchies like in morocco and monarchy in gulf countries, republics, military dictators and we cannot put all the country in the same baskets and morocco started at the beginning immediately after gaining independence. we fight against the party, we established the first constitution in 1962 and since this time, we've amended this constitution four times. and i think that also in morocco thanks to the vigors of the society and the freedom of press and protests and manifestation we all the time work on our... walk on our two legs-- political leg and also social and economic leg. and maybe the error was made when during the last decade some countries want security through economy without trying to convince others that it's imp
, both before and after the u.s.-led invasion of 2001. and from 1991 to 1993 he was the foreign minister of algeria. he is currently a distinguished fellow at the london school of economics. he is one of the elders, a group of eminent global leaders brought together by nelson mandela to try to solve the world's problems-- or at least offer some advice. i am pleased to have him back on this program. welcome back. >> thank you very much. it's good to be here. >> rose: so let's just start with the obvious. what kind of advice should you be offering and the group of elders about change in the middle east? >> you know, this change is definitely taking place. it is the work of the people of the region of the different countries. there is a lesson of humility there. nobody has predicted how and when it was going to happen. >> rose: or that it was. >> that it was going to happen. nor the order in which it's happening. so i think we... if we learn that lesson of humility, that's already a great contribution. the second thing is, you know, in places like tunisia and egypt they have been facing the
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